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Franciska útikönyve

Franciska

Franciska útikönyve

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Have a taste of Budapest, Hungary! The best way to learn about a city and to find out what and where people eat. The city is undergoing a culinary revolution with new places appearing on the city’s gastro scene every year. Budapest has way too many restaurants, bistros, cafes, wine bars, and pubs to list all of them so we stick to those places that offer the best experience for your money. Browse our restaurant & cafe guides listing the best eats in town by area. Discover the secrets of Hungarian gastronomy, the famous goulash and the nation’s symbolic spice, the paprika.
Sarki Fűszeres is a tiny café and specialty store in Újlipótváros, an adorable, under-the-radar middle-class neighborhood. Try to go here for breakfast during the warm-weather months, when the outdoor terrace has opened. It's situated under a canopy of greens. The breakfast offerings include expertly prepared ham & eggs (€5), frankfurters (€5), and meat and cheese platters (€5). Inside, they sell high-end charcuterie, cheese, olives, and other specialty food products.
34
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Sarki Fűszeres
53-55 Pozsonyi út
34
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Sarki Fűszeres is a tiny café and specialty store in Újlipótváros, an adorable, under-the-radar middle-class neighborhood. Try to go here for breakfast during the warm-weather months, when the outdoor terrace has opened. It's situated under a canopy of greens. The breakfast offerings include expertly prepared ham & eggs (€5), frankfurters (€5), and meat and cheese platters (€5). Inside, they sell high-end charcuterie, cheese, olives, and other specialty food products.
Babka is named after Jerusalem stlyle chocolate cake to reflect the restaurant profile and food style. Colorful and tasty meals inspired by Meditarranean food culture with some international influences – often served at large tables surrounded by family and friends - This philosophy lies behind the Babka food and drink concept.
14
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Babka Budapest
3 Pozsonyi út
14
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Babka is named after Jerusalem stlyle chocolate cake to reflect the restaurant profile and food style. Colorful and tasty meals inspired by Meditarranean food culture with some international influences – often served at large tables surrounded by family and friends - This philosophy lies behind the Babka food and drink concept.
Dobrumba is inspired by our journeys over the past few years. Our cuisine incorporates flavors from the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and the Caucasus. We offer Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Moroccan, Israeli, Lebanese, Georgian, Armenian and Turkish dishes with a curated wine list in our thoughtful, modern space. FROM THE ATLAS MOUNTAINS TO ARARAT, FROM THE BOSPORUS TO GIBRALTAR - ALL AT HOME IN BUDAPEST'S SEVENTH DISTRICT
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Dobrumba
5 Dob u.
33
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Dobrumba is inspired by our journeys over the past few years. Our cuisine incorporates flavors from the Middle East, the Mediterranean, and the Caucasus. We offer Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Moroccan, Israeli, Lebanese, Georgian, Armenian and Turkish dishes with a curated wine list in our thoughtful, modern space. FROM THE ATLAS MOUNTAINS TO ARARAT, FROM THE BOSPORUS TO GIBRALTAR - ALL AT HOME IN BUDAPEST'S SEVENTH DISTRICT
Mazel Tov is an open hearted cultural space in the city's center, a streamlined and comforting place focusing on gastronomy in the 7th district, in the middle of the historically Jewish quarter, today's downtown's night-life center. This urban, recreational, dog-friendly garden laden with planted herbs and trees is transformed into a garden party location in the evenings. We wish to establish an informal, casual atmosphere, an easily digestible urban meeting point, which transforms into one of the most intimate and greenest arbors at dusk, every day of the week.
107
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Mazel Tov
47 Akácfa u.
107
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Mazel Tov is an open hearted cultural space in the city's center, a streamlined and comforting place focusing on gastronomy in the 7th district, in the middle of the historically Jewish quarter, today's downtown's night-life center. This urban, recreational, dog-friendly garden laden with planted herbs and trees is transformed into a garden party location in the evenings. We wish to establish an informal, casual atmosphere, an easily digestible urban meeting point, which transforms into one of the most intimate and greenest arbors at dusk, every day of the week.
When having opened Menza, we wanted to create a place where you can enjoy a traditional Pest style dining experience with a grand café-restaurant quality service. With our name and interior we salute the beloved retro era. Come and enjoy a perfect coffee on our terrace and taste delicious Hungarian dishes.
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Menza
2 Liszt Ferenc tér
199
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When having opened Menza, we wanted to create a place where you can enjoy a traditional Pest style dining experience with a grand café-restaurant quality service. With our name and interior we salute the beloved retro era. Come and enjoy a perfect coffee on our terrace and taste delicious Hungarian dishes.
Opened in 2002, Trattoria Pomo D'Oro is a wildly popular Italian restaurant in Budapest's downtown that marries a red-sauce, old-school Italian trattoria with a modern restaurant. This means that the place draws everyone from middle-class Hungarian families looking for Italian comfort food to foodies, business customers, and tourists. As a result, the ever-expanding space, which has managed to retain a cozy vibe, is packed to capacity with a mixed crowd every day of the week. While not cheap by Budapest standards—mains range from €10 to €20—price points aren't outrageous for its caliber. Here, it's hard to go wrong with anything, but I most enjoy the rich, Tuscan tomato soup (pappa al pomodoro; €6), the strozzapreti hand-rolled pasta (€9), and the branzino fillet, be it charcoal-grilled (€12) or steamed and filled with pancetta and black mussels (€15). The pizzas, prepared in a wood-burning oven, skew Neapolitan-style with an airy crust. Do save room for dessert as the profiterole and the good old tiramisu are among the best you'll find in Budapest. The long wine list features both Italian and Hungarian bottles. Note that Pomo D'Oro is most enjoyable in the evenings, as it's often overrun by business people from the nearby financial district at lunchtime. All in all, reliable Italian food and a friendly service rightfully make Pomo D'oro a sought-after restaurant in Budapest. Reservations are an absolute must.
62
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Trattoria Pomo D'Oro
9 Arany János u.
62
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Opened in 2002, Trattoria Pomo D'Oro is a wildly popular Italian restaurant in Budapest's downtown that marries a red-sauce, old-school Italian trattoria with a modern restaurant. This means that the place draws everyone from middle-class Hungarian families looking for Italian comfort food to foodies, business customers, and tourists. As a result, the ever-expanding space, which has managed to retain a cozy vibe, is packed to capacity with a mixed crowd every day of the week. While not cheap by Budapest standards—mains range from €10 to €20—price points aren't outrageous for its caliber. Here, it's hard to go wrong with anything, but I most enjoy the rich, Tuscan tomato soup (pappa al pomodoro; €6), the strozzapreti hand-rolled pasta (€9), and the branzino fillet, be it charcoal-grilled (€12) or steamed and filled with pancetta and black mussels (€15). The pizzas, prepared in a wood-burning oven, skew Neapolitan-style with an airy crust. Do save room for dessert as the profiterole and the good old tiramisu are among the best you'll find in Budapest. The long wine list features both Italian and Hungarian bottles. Note that Pomo D'Oro is most enjoyable in the evenings, as it's often overrun by business people from the nearby financial district at lunchtime. All in all, reliable Italian food and a friendly service rightfully make Pomo D'oro a sought-after restaurant in Budapest. Reservations are an absolute must.
The skybar and restaurant is situated on the top of a stylish design hotel called HOTEL RUM - thanks to its location, the 7th-floor bar offers a magical panoramic view of the Budapest skyline. Guests of TOPRUM can lounge 365 days a year in this amazingly designed place: in the cold months we keep the rooftop nice and cozy with a panorama glass wall, so the view remains uninterrupted, while in the summer you can lounge under the sky. TOPRUM's main expertise lies in the carefully selected bar food and brunch options to encourage tasting and sharing with a wide selection of fine wines and mouth-watering cocktail creations. While brunch is promoting a slow and healthy lifestyle, our bar food menu is based on the Hungarian and international classics. These dishes always come with a twist as prepared by chef Roland Varga. Late brunch hours on weekends and Wednesday evenings are dedicated to smooth jazz and live music with local performers on stage. And we celebrate the mornings with a buffet style breakfast and a wide range of food options - it's worth getting up early for that. We are among Dining Guide's TOP 5 Sunday Brunch places in Budapest, so it's definitely a must try! Whether it's a meeting with friends, a rendezvous, or a business event, we are waiting for you at the top of Budapest with a super staff taking care of you.
TOPRUM | Tapas & SkyBar
4 Királyi Pál u.
The skybar and restaurant is situated on the top of a stylish design hotel called HOTEL RUM - thanks to its location, the 7th-floor bar offers a magical panoramic view of the Budapest skyline. Guests of TOPRUM can lounge 365 days a year in this amazingly designed place: in the cold months we keep the rooftop nice and cozy with a panorama glass wall, so the view remains uninterrupted, while in the summer you can lounge under the sky. TOPRUM's main expertise lies in the carefully selected bar food and brunch options to encourage tasting and sharing with a wide selection of fine wines and mouth-watering cocktail creations. While brunch is promoting a slow and healthy lifestyle, our bar food menu is based on the Hungarian and international classics. These dishes always come with a twist as prepared by chef Roland Varga. Late brunch hours on weekends and Wednesday evenings are dedicated to smooth jazz and live music with local performers on stage. And we celebrate the mornings with a buffet style breakfast and a wide range of food options - it's worth getting up early for that. We are among Dining Guide's TOP 5 Sunday Brunch places in Budapest, so it's definitely a must try! Whether it's a meeting with friends, a rendezvous, or a business event, we are waiting for you at the top of Budapest with a super staff taking care of you.
Két Szerecsen is an ageless place. Két Szerecsen is a meeting point. Két Szerecsen is a coffeehouse in the old sense, where you can drop by in the morning, at noon or late at night. Where you can always see a smiling face. Where we await you with delicious food, in addition to excellent coffee. Where the cuisine blends simplicity with sophistication, and classical with trendy. The traditional flavours of a Parisian bistro with the stylish meals of modern gastronomy.
73
lokalkjente anbefaler
Két Szerecsen
14 Nagymező u.
73
lokalkjente anbefaler
Két Szerecsen is an ageless place. Két Szerecsen is a meeting point. Két Szerecsen is a coffeehouse in the old sense, where you can drop by in the morning, at noon or late at night. Where you can always see a smiling face. Where we await you with delicious food, in addition to excellent coffee. Where the cuisine blends simplicity with sophistication, and classical with trendy. The traditional flavours of a Parisian bistro with the stylish meals of modern gastronomy.
The best 'Wiener Schnitzel' in Budapest is at Buja Disznó(k). Buja Disznó(k) is located on the top floor of Hold Street’s Downtown Market. The market is Budapest’s premier casual dining market. We’re one of the market’s most popular eateries, and our guests can enjoy their meal at one of the long communal tables located just outside Buja Disznó(k). We are open Monday to Saturday. We are also happy to host private events outside the market’s official opening hours, and the unique style of the hall coupled with the relaxed atmosphere makes it the perfect location for a little sensuous debauchery.
Buja Disznó(k)
The best 'Wiener Schnitzel' in Budapest is at Buja Disznó(k). Buja Disznó(k) is located on the top floor of Hold Street’s Downtown Market. The market is Budapest’s premier casual dining market. We’re one of the market’s most popular eateries, and our guests can enjoy their meal at one of the long communal tables located just outside Buja Disznó(k). We are open Monday to Saturday. We are also happy to host private events outside the market’s official opening hours, and the unique style of the hall coupled with the relaxed atmosphere makes it the perfect location for a little sensuous debauchery.
Oriental Soup House is a hopping Vietnamese restaurant in Újlipótváros, a residential neighborhood a bit outside the city center. As soon as you enter, you'll notice the Asian cooks scurrying behind the open kitchen, always a good sign for a Vietnamese restaurant. The menu features 11 types of soups, of which the traditional beef pho (pho bo; €6) with a gleaming, flavorful broth is among the best I've had in Budapest, especially if you get it with thinly sliced tenderloins that quickly cook through in the steaming broth. The bun cha, grilled pork patties with springy rice noodles and a profusion of fresh herbs and vegetables, is wonderfully refreshing (€6). Round out your meal with a Vietnamese chè dessert (€3), which is a luscious tapioca pudding with mango and pomegranate seeds. Oriental Soup House is wildly popular, so try booking in advance. (If you don't, you may have to sit at one of the long communal tables in the middle of the space on backless wooden stools.) After your meal, roam around the neighborhood, known for its modernist buildings from the 1930s and 1940s, especially those along Pozsonyi Road, the main artery of the area. Note that Oriental Soup House has another location in downtown, but this one draws more locals.
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Oriental Soup House
35 Balzac u.
23
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Oriental Soup House is a hopping Vietnamese restaurant in Újlipótváros, a residential neighborhood a bit outside the city center. As soon as you enter, you'll notice the Asian cooks scurrying behind the open kitchen, always a good sign for a Vietnamese restaurant. The menu features 11 types of soups, of which the traditional beef pho (pho bo; €6) with a gleaming, flavorful broth is among the best I've had in Budapest, especially if you get it with thinly sliced tenderloins that quickly cook through in the steaming broth. The bun cha, grilled pork patties with springy rice noodles and a profusion of fresh herbs and vegetables, is wonderfully refreshing (€6). Round out your meal with a Vietnamese chè dessert (€3), which is a luscious tapioca pudding with mango and pomegranate seeds. Oriental Soup House is wildly popular, so try booking in advance. (If you don't, you may have to sit at one of the long communal tables in the middle of the space on backless wooden stools.) After your meal, roam around the neighborhood, known for its modernist buildings from the 1930s and 1940s, especially those along Pozsonyi Road, the main artery of the area. Note that Oriental Soup House has another location in downtown, but this one draws more locals.
Part café, part restaurant, part bar, Keksz is a hybrid space located under the stately arch that marks the entry point of Budapest's party district. There are a handful of passable traditional Hungarian dishes here—including a goulash soup (€5), a catfish paprikash (€7), and a lecsó (€6), which is similar to a ratatouille—but you're best off sticking to the breakfast-all-day offerings like the scrambled eggs or the panini selections. The crowd consists of a healthy mix of locals and tourists, many of whom come here for coffee or drinks only. One of the best things about Keksz is how cheap it is, especially compared to the rest of the neighborhood; a glass of beer or wine runs only €2. If you like IPAs, go for "Keksz," the hoppy house ale on draft.
12
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Keksz
4 Madách Imre tér
12
lokalkjente anbefaler
Part café, part restaurant, part bar, Keksz is a hybrid space located under the stately arch that marks the entry point of Budapest's party district. There are a handful of passable traditional Hungarian dishes here—including a goulash soup (€5), a catfish paprikash (€7), and a lecsó (€6), which is similar to a ratatouille—but you're best off sticking to the breakfast-all-day offerings like the scrambled eggs or the panini selections. The crowd consists of a healthy mix of locals and tourists, many of whom come here for coffee or drinks only. One of the best things about Keksz is how cheap it is, especially compared to the rest of the neighborhood; a glass of beer or wine runs only €2. If you like IPAs, go for "Keksz," the hoppy house ale on draft.
Börze is a sleek downtown restaurant serving traditional Hungarian fare from early morning until midnight, seven days a week. With red banquettes and a chic interior designed to the minute detail, the vibes evoke a Keith McNally restaurant. Börze's moniker is a hat-tip to the enormous pre-war building across the street that used to be the Budapest Stock and Commodity Exchange. Börze is a 2017 offshoot of Menza, and like its sister restaurant, it's a well-oiled machine with reliable dishes and a kind waitstaff. There's a range of egg-based breakfast foods, but I usually go for the snappy-skinned frankfurters with a side of spicy Dijon-style mustard and sliced rustic bread (€4), or the bundáskenyér, Hungary's savory take on the French toast. For dinner, try the cordon bleu (€12), a crispy, breaded pork schnitzel layered with cheese and ham. Also good are the Hungarian classics: the chicken paprikash (€12), and the rakott krumpli, which is a potato gratin laced with sausage and eggs (€9). Round out your meal with túrógombóc (€5), plump, sweet-tart cottage cheese dumplings topped with sour cream and apricot jam. Apart from tourists, Börze also attracts locals with a €5 weekday two-course lunch prix-fixe, which is especially popular among office workers. Once here, be sure to roam around Liberty Square, Budapest’s most monumental public park just around the corner.
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Börze
23 Nádor u.
21
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Börze is a sleek downtown restaurant serving traditional Hungarian fare from early morning until midnight, seven days a week. With red banquettes and a chic interior designed to the minute detail, the vibes evoke a Keith McNally restaurant. Börze's moniker is a hat-tip to the enormous pre-war building across the street that used to be the Budapest Stock and Commodity Exchange. Börze is a 2017 offshoot of Menza, and like its sister restaurant, it's a well-oiled machine with reliable dishes and a kind waitstaff. There's a range of egg-based breakfast foods, but I usually go for the snappy-skinned frankfurters with a side of spicy Dijon-style mustard and sliced rustic bread (€4), or the bundáskenyér, Hungary's savory take on the French toast. For dinner, try the cordon bleu (€12), a crispy, breaded pork schnitzel layered with cheese and ham. Also good are the Hungarian classics: the chicken paprikash (€12), and the rakott krumpli, which is a potato gratin laced with sausage and eggs (€9). Round out your meal with túrógombóc (€5), plump, sweet-tart cottage cheese dumplings topped with sour cream and apricot jam. Apart from tourists, Börze also attracts locals with a €5 weekday two-course lunch prix-fixe, which is especially popular among office workers. Once here, be sure to roam around Liberty Square, Budapest’s most monumental public park just around the corner.
À la Maison Grand is a chic breakfast restaurant in the middle of Budapest's downtown, occupying the ground floor of a 1906 art nouveau building (take a glance at the striking glass mosaic perched atop the building). Fashionable, tourist-heavy crowds flock here for the breakfast-all-day and brunch offerings that include reliably prepared croque madame (€5), eggs Florentine (€7), waffles, and also zeitgesty items like acai bowl and avocado toast (€7). The only letdowns are the the undersized and forlorn-looking English (€10) and Hungarian breakfast plates (€12). Apart from tourists, the bustling space is also popular for local groups of girlfriends, who often accompany their breakfast dishes with strawberry mimosas from the full service bar. The owners spared no expense on the gleaming white, high-ceilinged interior that features plush chairs and comfortable, dusty-blue sofas. Reservations are recommended.
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Á la Maison Breakfast and Brunch Restaurant
3 Szervita tér
24
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À la Maison Grand is a chic breakfast restaurant in the middle of Budapest's downtown, occupying the ground floor of a 1906 art nouveau building (take a glance at the striking glass mosaic perched atop the building). Fashionable, tourist-heavy crowds flock here for the breakfast-all-day and brunch offerings that include reliably prepared croque madame (€5), eggs Florentine (€7), waffles, and also zeitgesty items like acai bowl and avocado toast (€7). The only letdowns are the the undersized and forlorn-looking English (€10) and Hungarian breakfast plates (€12). Apart from tourists, the bustling space is also popular for local groups of girlfriends, who often accompany their breakfast dishes with strawberry mimosas from the full service bar. The owners spared no expense on the gleaming white, high-ceilinged interior that features plush chairs and comfortable, dusty-blue sofas. Reservations are recommended.
Szimply is a teeny-tiny breakfast-all-day restaurant in the cobble-stoned courtyard of a pre-war downtown building. Partly thanks to a New York Times article that also featured Szimply (Budapest is #50), it's next to impossible to find an open table at this closet-sized breakfast nook. The short menu is a collection of on-trend international breakfast staples, most of which are expertly prepared (and pricey). Naturally, there's avocado toast (€12), strewn with chickpeas, beets, pickled onions, and ruccola. It's very good. The vegetable-forward menu changes seasonally, but it's usually heavy on vegan and gluten-free options. Note that in the name of good health, Szimply doesn't serve alcohol. The crowd, as you may have already guessed, is chic and international. If you order coffee, it will arrive from Kontakt, a specialty coffee shop next door to Szimply and run by the same owners (with a strict "no americano" and "no sugar" policy).
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Szimply - Breakfast & brunch
22 Károly krt.
18
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Szimply is a teeny-tiny breakfast-all-day restaurant in the cobble-stoned courtyard of a pre-war downtown building. Partly thanks to a New York Times article that also featured Szimply (Budapest is #50), it's next to impossible to find an open table at this closet-sized breakfast nook. The short menu is a collection of on-trend international breakfast staples, most of which are expertly prepared (and pricey). Naturally, there's avocado toast (€12), strewn with chickpeas, beets, pickled onions, and ruccola. It's very good. The vegetable-forward menu changes seasonally, but it's usually heavy on vegan and gluten-free options. Note that in the name of good health, Szimply doesn't serve alcohol. The crowd, as you may have already guessed, is chic and international. If you order coffee, it will arrive from Kontakt, a specialty coffee shop next door to Szimply and run by the same owners (with a strict "no americano" and "no sugar" policy).
Törökméz is a cute restaurant perched on Rózsadomb, the steep hill on the Buda side of the Danube. They specialize in breakfast foods that are inspired from around the world: there's everything from tasty huevos rancheros to acai bowl, avocado toast, Cuban sandwich, and English breakfast (all €7-9). If you'd prefer something more indigenous to the region, go for the snappy frankfurters (€5), or the bundáskenyér (€3), which is similar to a savory French toast. Local Hungarian wines are also available. Being on the Buda side, away from the tourist-heavy areas, Törökméz draws a mainly local crowd. Once here, it's worth visiting climbing up to the scenic tomb of Gül Baba, located almost around the corner from Törökméz. Gül Baba was a Bektashi monk who died in 1541 during the city's Ottoman occupation, and today his tomb is the northernmost point of Islamic pilgrimage in the world. It's a scenic and tranquil area with sweeping views of Budapest.
13
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Törökméz
27 Margit utca
13
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Törökméz is a cute restaurant perched on Rózsadomb, the steep hill on the Buda side of the Danube. They specialize in breakfast foods that are inspired from around the world: there's everything from tasty huevos rancheros to acai bowl, avocado toast, Cuban sandwich, and English breakfast (all €7-9). If you'd prefer something more indigenous to the region, go for the snappy frankfurters (€5), or the bundáskenyér (€3), which is similar to a savory French toast. Local Hungarian wines are also available. Being on the Buda side, away from the tourist-heavy areas, Törökméz draws a mainly local crowd. Once here, it's worth visiting climbing up to the scenic tomb of Gül Baba, located almost around the corner from Törökméz. Gül Baba was a Bektashi monk who died in 1541 during the city's Ottoman occupation, and today his tomb is the northernmost point of Islamic pilgrimage in the world. It's a scenic and tranquil area with sweeping views of Budapest.
Gerlóczy is a snug café and restaurant tucked away on an unusually quiet pocket of Budapest's downtown. The charming plaza outside the restaurant, surrounded by elegant pre-war buildings, is one of the best-kept secrets of this otherwise tourist-packed neighborhood. Gerlóczy's interior evokes French bistro vibes, complete with small round tables, leather banquettes, and a high ceiling. In the warm months, the outdoor terrace is especially enjoyable (whenever the local municipality isn't using this precious space for construction equipment storage). In the mornings, there are reliable pan-European breakfast staples like a pair of frankfurters with a side of mustard, omelettes, and quiche (€6). Be sure to also order a bread basket, which contains warm and crusty slices. The dinner menu is a hodgepodge of dishes including everything from a goulash soup (€6) to beef stew (€13), seafood pasta (€9), and filet mignon (€18). If you enjoy the ambiance, note that Gerlóczy also operates a boutique hotel on the upstairs floors.
34
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Gerlóczy Cafe
1 Gerlóczy u.
34
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Gerlóczy is a snug café and restaurant tucked away on an unusually quiet pocket of Budapest's downtown. The charming plaza outside the restaurant, surrounded by elegant pre-war buildings, is one of the best-kept secrets of this otherwise tourist-packed neighborhood. Gerlóczy's interior evokes French bistro vibes, complete with small round tables, leather banquettes, and a high ceiling. In the warm months, the outdoor terrace is especially enjoyable (whenever the local municipality isn't using this precious space for construction equipment storage). In the mornings, there are reliable pan-European breakfast staples like a pair of frankfurters with a side of mustard, omelettes, and quiche (€6). Be sure to also order a bread basket, which contains warm and crusty slices. The dinner menu is a hodgepodge of dishes including everything from a goulash soup (€6) to beef stew (€13), seafood pasta (€9), and filet mignon (€18). If you enjoy the ambiance, note that Gerlóczy also operates a boutique hotel on the upstairs floors.
Curious where the top one percent of Buda residents hang out? Wonder no more. The owners of Déryné Bistro were ahead of the curve when in 2007 they opened this chic restaurant featuring a Balthazar-like interior straight out of the Keith McNally playbook. Back then, few places in Budapest offered this brand of casually-hip-but-classy vibes. Déryné has managed to remain popular for all these years, even as similar restaurants have sprouted up on the other side of the Danube with comparable offerings at lower prices. The menu skews French, featuring pricey but reliably prepared bistro staples including a bouillabaisse (€9) and foie gras (€14). But you'll also find the usual suspects of Hungarian fare here: goulash soup, pork schnitzel (€18), and túrógombóc, which is a sweet-tart cottage cheese dumpling eaten as a dessert (€6). If steaks are more your speed, you can choose from prime cuts of dry-aged Angus and Wagyu. Eggs benedict, shakshuka, and avocado toast are just a few of the exhaustive breakfast and brunch offerings that are served until 4 p.m. on weekends. Déryné's service team is among the most professional in Budapest, but I wish they weren't so eager to upsell the most expensive dishes to customers (even to regulars).
63
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Déryné Bisztró
3 Krisztina tér
63
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Curious where the top one percent of Buda residents hang out? Wonder no more. The owners of Déryné Bistro were ahead of the curve when in 2007 they opened this chic restaurant featuring a Balthazar-like interior straight out of the Keith McNally playbook. Back then, few places in Budapest offered this brand of casually-hip-but-classy vibes. Déryné has managed to remain popular for all these years, even as similar restaurants have sprouted up on the other side of the Danube with comparable offerings at lower prices. The menu skews French, featuring pricey but reliably prepared bistro staples including a bouillabaisse (€9) and foie gras (€14). But you'll also find the usual suspects of Hungarian fare here: goulash soup, pork schnitzel (€18), and túrógombóc, which is a sweet-tart cottage cheese dumpling eaten as a dessert (€6). If steaks are more your speed, you can choose from prime cuts of dry-aged Angus and Wagyu. Eggs benedict, shakshuka, and avocado toast are just a few of the exhaustive breakfast and brunch offerings that are served until 4 p.m. on weekends. Déryné's service team is among the most professional in Budapest, but I wish they weren't so eager to upsell the most expensive dishes to customers (even to regulars).
Három Tarka Macska is an artisan bakery on the tastefully upscale Pozsonyi Road in Újlipótváros, a well-heeled area I think of as the “West Village of Budapest.” Step inside, and a paradise of aromatic and still-steaming sourdough, whole wheat, and rye breads, brioches, and rolls in all shapes and sizes await you. The two must-try local favorites are the túrós batyu (a sweet-tart cottage cheese-filled laminated pastry) and the kakaós csiga (a snail-shaped chocolate pastry roll), which go down especially well with the flavored yogurts that Három Tarka Macska sources from a local family-owned producer. While mainly a takeout bakery, omelettes and freshly-made sandwiches are also available for a sit-down meal. The customers comprise a cross section of local residents, including snazzy millennials, families with young children, and moneyed senior citizens with purebred dogs by their sides. Once here, be sure to also roam around this charming neighborhood.
14
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Három Tarka Macska
41 Pozsonyi út
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Három Tarka Macska is an artisan bakery on the tastefully upscale Pozsonyi Road in Újlipótváros, a well-heeled area I think of as the “West Village of Budapest.” Step inside, and a paradise of aromatic and still-steaming sourdough, whole wheat, and rye breads, brioches, and rolls in all shapes and sizes await you. The two must-try local favorites are the túrós batyu (a sweet-tart cottage cheese-filled laminated pastry) and the kakaós csiga (a snail-shaped chocolate pastry roll), which go down especially well with the flavored yogurts that Három Tarka Macska sources from a local family-owned producer. While mainly a takeout bakery, omelettes and freshly-made sandwiches are also available for a sit-down meal. The customers comprise a cross section of local residents, including snazzy millennials, families with young children, and moneyed senior citizens with purebred dogs by their sides. Once here, be sure to also roam around this charming neighborhood.
The Buda side of the city has begun to catch up to Pest when it comes to having chic, new-wave breakfast joints. New wave? The kinds of places that cater to global tastes with dishes that wouldn’t seem out of place anywhere from Sydney to San Francisco: avocado toast, eggs Benedict, pancake, granola bowl, and the like. There’s nothing memorable about Cinnamon’s all-day breakfast dishes, but they’re perfectly satisfying. The avocado toast arrives topped with smoked salmon on a soft, open-faced ciabatta (€8). Also good are the omelettes, and the pair of snappy frankfurters with a side of mustard (€5), a typical Central European morning dish. Of the breakfast pastries, I went for the cinnamon-dusted donut, and it delivered: a thin layer of sugar-cinnamon coating yielded to a soft inside lined with apple custard (€2). In the mornings, throngs of slick local office workers swarm to Cinnamon's tables, or drop by to get their coffee fix, so a short wait is not unusual during peak breakfast hours. By lunch-time, tourists tend to emerge for a sleepy breakfast.
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Cinnamon
21 Csalogány u.
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The Buda side of the city has begun to catch up to Pest when it comes to having chic, new-wave breakfast joints. New wave? The kinds of places that cater to global tastes with dishes that wouldn’t seem out of place anywhere from Sydney to San Francisco: avocado toast, eggs Benedict, pancake, granola bowl, and the like. There’s nothing memorable about Cinnamon’s all-day breakfast dishes, but they’re perfectly satisfying. The avocado toast arrives topped with smoked salmon on a soft, open-faced ciabatta (€8). Also good are the omelettes, and the pair of snappy frankfurters with a side of mustard (€5), a typical Central European morning dish. Of the breakfast pastries, I went for the cinnamon-dusted donut, and it delivered: a thin layer of sugar-cinnamon coating yielded to a soft inside lined with apple custard (€2). In the mornings, throngs of slick local office workers swarm to Cinnamon's tables, or drop by to get their coffee fix, so a short wait is not unusual during peak breakfast hours. By lunch-time, tourists tend to emerge for a sleepy breakfast.
Kiosk Pest is a buzzing restaurant and cocktail bar in the heart of Budapest, favored by trendy locals and plenty of tourists. Kiosk has at least two things going for it: a stunning view of the Danube and the Elisabeth Bridge from its outdoor patio, and a dramatically high-ceilinged, industrial-chic interior. (Interestingly, the building houses a Roman Catholic high school upstairs, in fact, there's a chapel right above Kiosk.) The restaurant aims to please all tastes with a diverse menu that includes everything from salads to burgers, pastas, steaks, and even a whole section dedicated to Hungarian classics. Despite the wide reach, the dishes are tasty and reliable, although slightly overpriced by local standards. I most enjoy here the hearty goulash soup (€6), and the mákosguba (€5), a vanilla-soaked, poppy seeds-laced dessert popular across Central Europe — Kiosk's version is the best I've had in Budapest. During the week, there's a three-course lunch prix fixe for €9. In the warmer months, follow the throngs to the outdoor terrace, which is where the action shifts to.
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Kiosk Budapest
4 Március 15. tér
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Kiosk Pest is a buzzing restaurant and cocktail bar in the heart of Budapest, favored by trendy locals and plenty of tourists. Kiosk has at least two things going for it: a stunning view of the Danube and the Elisabeth Bridge from its outdoor patio, and a dramatically high-ceilinged, industrial-chic interior. (Interestingly, the building houses a Roman Catholic high school upstairs, in fact, there's a chapel right above Kiosk.) The restaurant aims to please all tastes with a diverse menu that includes everything from salads to burgers, pastas, steaks, and even a whole section dedicated to Hungarian classics. Despite the wide reach, the dishes are tasty and reliable, although slightly overpriced by local standards. I most enjoy here the hearty goulash soup (€6), and the mákosguba (€5), a vanilla-soaked, poppy seeds-laced dessert popular across Central Europe — Kiosk's version is the best I've had in Budapest. During the week, there's a three-course lunch prix fixe for €9. In the warmer months, follow the throngs to the outdoor terrace, which is where the action shifts to.
A rooftop view in Budapest can amount to an impromptu 20th-century history lesson of Hungary. Scan the Danube's bank from atop, and you'll see classically-proportioned, grand buildings alternating, seemingly randomly, with glass and concrete boxes. Those modern structures, not all of them visually pleasing, sprung up during the communist era (1947-1989) to replace what's been flattened by WWII bombings. You can see it for yourself at Leo, a sleek rooftop bar in Buda perched above the swanky Hotel Clark but open to the public. It's almost literally within arm's reach of the Chain Bridge, a historic Budapest landmark, with equally good views of the Buda Castle, and, well, the whole city. Taking in the views from here, even to locals, is an absorbing experience. Accordingly, prices are pretty steep by Budapest standards, though not unreasonable—cocktails and aperitifs run €12. (If you're on a budget, grab some beers at a grocery store and hike up to the vantage point above the Buda Castle Tunnel nearby for similar views). Note that Leo usually fills up days in advance, so try booking early. Also, they're only open during the outdoor season, usually from May to September.
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Leo Rooftop Budapest
1 Clark Ádám tér
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A rooftop view in Budapest can amount to an impromptu 20th-century history lesson of Hungary. Scan the Danube's bank from atop, and you'll see classically-proportioned, grand buildings alternating, seemingly randomly, with glass and concrete boxes. Those modern structures, not all of them visually pleasing, sprung up during the communist era (1947-1989) to replace what's been flattened by WWII bombings. You can see it for yourself at Leo, a sleek rooftop bar in Buda perched above the swanky Hotel Clark but open to the public. It's almost literally within arm's reach of the Chain Bridge, a historic Budapest landmark, with equally good views of the Buda Castle, and, well, the whole city. Taking in the views from here, even to locals, is an absorbing experience. Accordingly, prices are pretty steep by Budapest standards, though not unreasonable—cocktails and aperitifs run €12. (If you're on a budget, grab some beers at a grocery store and hike up to the vantage point above the Buda Castle Tunnel nearby for similar views). Note that Leo usually fills up days in advance, so try booking early. Also, they're only open during the outdoor season, usually from May to September.
With stunning views onto both the Castle Hill and the nearby Danube river, the location of Felix is hard to beat. The restaurant, which serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner, is located inside a refurbished landmark building from the 19th century designed by Miklós Ybl, the head architect also behind the Budapest Opera House. In terms of prices and ambiance, Felix is a notch above trendy spots but it's also more casual than stiff-lipped fine dining establishments. The food here pays homage to Hungarian classics while incorporating small twists and turns. For example, the foie gras (€15) arrives sitting in a Japanese ponzu sauce. Even local Hungarians will enjoy the goulash soup (€6) and the expertly prepared chicken paprikash (€15). The best way to end your meal here is with aranygaluska—sweet yeast buns coated in ground walnut and smothered in creamy vanilla custard (€8). Don't miss them (an order is meant for up to three people). The wine program, overseen by Máté Horváth, one of Hungary's top sommeliers, features many celebrated Hungarian winemakers with a whole page dedicated to Tokaj's dry wines. For breakfast, which is served every day of the week, go with the avocado toast (€8), a dish often relegated to a check-the-box status these days. At Felix, a lightly toasted, cereal-crusted dark sourdough arrives blanketed in avocado cream, pomegranate seeds, and a perfectly poached egg. Also good is the acai bowl (€6), but you're better off skipping the bagel with lox and the eggs Benedict.
FELIX Kitchen&Bar
9 Ybl Miklós tér
With stunning views onto both the Castle Hill and the nearby Danube river, the location of Felix is hard to beat. The restaurant, which serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner, is located inside a refurbished landmark building from the 19th century designed by Miklós Ybl, the head architect also behind the Budapest Opera House. In terms of prices and ambiance, Felix is a notch above trendy spots but it's also more casual than stiff-lipped fine dining establishments. The food here pays homage to Hungarian classics while incorporating small twists and turns. For example, the foie gras (€15) arrives sitting in a Japanese ponzu sauce. Even local Hungarians will enjoy the goulash soup (€6) and the expertly prepared chicken paprikash (€15). The best way to end your meal here is with aranygaluska—sweet yeast buns coated in ground walnut and smothered in creamy vanilla custard (€8). Don't miss them (an order is meant for up to three people). The wine program, overseen by Máté Horváth, one of Hungary's top sommeliers, features many celebrated Hungarian winemakers with a whole page dedicated to Tokaj's dry wines. For breakfast, which is served every day of the week, go with the avocado toast (€8), a dish often relegated to a check-the-box status these days. At Felix, a lightly toasted, cereal-crusted dark sourdough arrives blanketed in avocado cream, pomegranate seeds, and a perfectly poached egg. Also good is the acai bowl (€6), but you're better off skipping the bagel with lox and the eggs Benedict.
In 2015, three young Vietnamese-Hungarians with a passion for cooking and a background in fashion and design launched a trendy Asian-fusion restaurant, Sáo, in the tourist-packed Jewish Quarter of Budapest. Spurred by Sáo's success, they later opened KHAN, another chic, Instragram-friendly venue, situated in the residential Újlipótváros neighborhood a bit outside the city center. Here, too, a striking interior complete with contemporary art, sleek wood finishes, concrete columns, and Asian collectibles is positively overwhelming. And here, too, the dishes are a collection of slightly overpriced but tasty pan-Asian staples ranging from dumplings (€6) to pho soups (€9), tempura (€6), fried rice (€9), and fried noodles (€10). If a hopping spot with a striking interior—food is served in beautifully hand-crafted Vietnamese ceramic bowls—gets you going, then you'll likely enjoy KHAN. Otherwise, you can also explore some of Budapest's more under-the-radar Asian restaurants that serve more adventurous dishes at lower price points (see the best Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese restaurants).
KHAN Asian Food & Bar
3 Ipoly u.
In 2015, three young Vietnamese-Hungarians with a passion for cooking and a background in fashion and design launched a trendy Asian-fusion restaurant, Sáo, in the tourist-packed Jewish Quarter of Budapest. Spurred by Sáo's success, they later opened KHAN, another chic, Instragram-friendly venue, situated in the residential Újlipótváros neighborhood a bit outside the city center. Here, too, a striking interior complete with contemporary art, sleek wood finishes, concrete columns, and Asian collectibles is positively overwhelming. And here, too, the dishes are a collection of slightly overpriced but tasty pan-Asian staples ranging from dumplings (€6) to pho soups (€9), tempura (€6), fried rice (€9), and fried noodles (€10). If a hopping spot with a striking interior—food is served in beautifully hand-crafted Vietnamese ceramic bowls—gets you going, then you'll likely enjoy KHAN. Otherwise, you can also explore some of Budapest's more under-the-radar Asian restaurants that serve more adventurous dishes at lower price points (see the best Chinese, Japanese, and Vietnamese restaurants).
Bestia is a buzzing restaurant in the heart of Budapest specializing in grilled meats. With a picture-postcard view of the St. Stephen’s Basilica, an edgy industrial chic decor, and loud music piping through the speakers, it has quickly become a favorite among trendy tourists and locals alike. If you’re feeling adventurous, start your meal with the roasted bone marrow and toast, silky, jiggly white stuff arriving inside two massive slabs of veal shanks. Scoop out the rich fat and spread it on the whole wheat toast (€10). Also good are the pork ribs (€19) — made in a Josper charcoal burning oven — packing a smoky flavor and glazed in a sweet-tart barbecue sauce. You are, however, better off skipping the undersized Angus burger with a side of sad-looking roast potatoes for a whopping €14. If premium cuts of pricey steaks are your speed, you can have it all here. The menu also features two Hungarian classics — a goulash soup and a somlói galuska dessert — both of which deserve your attention. Bestia's full-service bar serves both customized cocktails of local craft beers on draft.
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BESTIA
9 Szent István tér
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Bestia is a buzzing restaurant in the heart of Budapest specializing in grilled meats. With a picture-postcard view of the St. Stephen’s Basilica, an edgy industrial chic decor, and loud music piping through the speakers, it has quickly become a favorite among trendy tourists and locals alike. If you’re feeling adventurous, start your meal with the roasted bone marrow and toast, silky, jiggly white stuff arriving inside two massive slabs of veal shanks. Scoop out the rich fat and spread it on the whole wheat toast (€10). Also good are the pork ribs (€19) — made in a Josper charcoal burning oven — packing a smoky flavor and glazed in a sweet-tart barbecue sauce. You are, however, better off skipping the undersized Angus burger with a side of sad-looking roast potatoes for a whopping €14. If premium cuts of pricey steaks are your speed, you can have it all here. The menu also features two Hungarian classics — a goulash soup and a somlói galuska dessert — both of which deserve your attention. Bestia's full-service bar serves both customized cocktails of local craft beers on draft.
Városnézés
Budapest’s version of the Champs-Élysées, this 2.3 km (1.4 mile) grand boulevard connects the city center with Heroes' Square and the City Park. Starting in downtown, you will pass fancy retail stores, then end up amongst handsome villas, many of them embassies now, taking in the heart of the city along your way. Be sure to pause at the Opera House and the House of Terror. If you have extra energy, visit some of the treasures hidden in the side streets.
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Andrássy út
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Budapest’s version of the Champs-Élysées, this 2.3 km (1.4 mile) grand boulevard connects the city center with Heroes' Square and the City Park. Starting in downtown, you will pass fancy retail stores, then end up amongst handsome villas, many of them embassies now, taking in the heart of the city along your way. Be sure to pause at the Opera House and the House of Terror. If you have extra energy, visit some of the treasures hidden in the side streets.
The imposing Buda Castle overlooks the city from its elevated position atop Várhegy (Castle Hill), rising forty-eight meters above the Danube. The castle has had a tumultuous history that reflects the ups and downs of Hungary's fortunes.
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Buda slott
2 Szent György tér
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The imposing Buda Castle overlooks the city from its elevated position atop Várhegy (Castle Hill), rising forty-eight meters above the Danube. The castle has had a tumultuous history that reflects the ups and downs of Hungary's fortunes.
Fisherman's Bastion (Halászbástya) is the panoramic viewing terrace with fairy tale towers in Budapest.
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Fiskerbastionen
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Fisherman's Bastion (Halászbástya) is the panoramic viewing terrace with fairy tale towers in Budapest.
Matthias Church is one of the finest churches in Budapest, and the most unique churches in Europe. Located atop the Buda Castle hill, it has been serving the citizens of the Buda Castle Hill since 1015, its foundation by the first Hungarian king. Bored with churches? Not this time. Full of surprises, mysteries and treasures, the church has a breathtaking interior with colours inspired by orientalism and romantic historicism. Its mystically exotic atmosphere paired with its Neo-Gothic features differentiates it from any other church.
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Matthias Church
2 Szentháromság tér
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Matthias Church is one of the finest churches in Budapest, and the most unique churches in Europe. Located atop the Buda Castle hill, it has been serving the citizens of the Buda Castle Hill since 1015, its foundation by the first Hungarian king. Bored with churches? Not this time. Full of surprises, mysteries and treasures, the church has a breathtaking interior with colours inspired by orientalism and romantic historicism. Its mystically exotic atmosphere paired with its Neo-Gothic features differentiates it from any other church.
Traveling by the Buda Hill Funicular is a pleasant and fairly cheap way to save your legs a hike when you want to get up to the Buda Castle Hill from the river level on Adam Clarke square. Enjoy the ride on a historical cable car! Located at the Buda end of the Chain Bridge, the fun ride on the Funicular takes only a few minutes, and it does provide a unique and beautiful view of Budapest, the River Danube, and sights at the top of Castle Hill, such as the Fisherman’s Bastion. From the top, you will even see the Margaret Island on the left or the beautiful Art Nouveau style Gresham Palace on the Pest side of the river. Running every 10 minutes up and down the Castle Hill from early morning till late at night, do not be recoiled by the queues.
Buda Castle Funicular
Traveling by the Buda Hill Funicular is a pleasant and fairly cheap way to save your legs a hike when you want to get up to the Buda Castle Hill from the river level on Adam Clarke square. Enjoy the ride on a historical cable car! Located at the Buda end of the Chain Bridge, the fun ride on the Funicular takes only a few minutes, and it does provide a unique and beautiful view of Budapest, the River Danube, and sights at the top of Castle Hill, such as the Fisherman’s Bastion. From the top, you will even see the Margaret Island on the left or the beautiful Art Nouveau style Gresham Palace on the Pest side of the river. Running every 10 minutes up and down the Castle Hill from early morning till late at night, do not be recoiled by the queues.
Heroes’ Sq is the largest and most symbolic square in Budapest. It is dominated by the Millenary Monument (Ezeréves emlékmű), a 36m-high pillar topped by a golden Archangel Gabriel, holding the Hungarian crown and a cross. At the column's base are Prince Árpád and six other Magyar chieftains who occupied the Carpathian Basin in the late 9th century. The 14 statues in the colonnades behind are of rulers and statesmen – from King Stephen (far left) to Lajos Kossuth (far right). It was designed in 1896 to mark the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest of the Carpathian Basin.
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Heroes' Square
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Heroes’ Sq is the largest and most symbolic square in Budapest. It is dominated by the Millenary Monument (Ezeréves emlékmű), a 36m-high pillar topped by a golden Archangel Gabriel, holding the Hungarian crown and a cross. At the column's base are Prince Árpád and six other Magyar chieftains who occupied the Carpathian Basin in the late 9th century. The 14 statues in the colonnades behind are of rulers and statesmen – from King Stephen (far left) to Lajos Kossuth (far right). It was designed in 1896 to mark the 1000th anniversary of the Magyar conquest of the Carpathian Basin.
Városliget (City Park) is a public park in Budapest close to the city centre. Its main entrance is Heroes' Square (Hősök tere), one of Hungary's World Heritage sites.
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City Park
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Városliget (City Park) is a public park in Budapest close to the city centre. Its main entrance is Heroes' Square (Hősök tere), one of Hungary's World Heritage sites.
Built during Budapest’s golden era when the city was a capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, this monumental Gothic Revival building dominates its Danube bank. The 45-minute guided tour is just the right amount of time to appreciate its lavish interior without getting tired and lost in one of its 691 rooms.
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Ungarns parlamentsbygning
1-3 Kossuth Lajos tér
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Built during Budapest’s golden era when the city was a capital of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, this monumental Gothic Revival building dominates its Danube bank. The 45-minute guided tour is just the right amount of time to appreciate its lavish interior without getting tired and lost in one of its 691 rooms.
Szechenyi Bath is the biggest and most popular of all the thermal baths in Budapest. What is more, it is one of the biggest natural hot spring spa baths in Europe too. Szechenyi Bath is 100 years old in 2013, and throughout its century-old history, about 100 millions of bathers have enjoyed the warm medicinal waters and the fun pools.
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Széchenyi termalbad
9-11 Állatkerti krt.
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Szechenyi Bath is the biggest and most popular of all the thermal baths in Budapest. What is more, it is one of the biggest natural hot spring spa baths in Europe too. Szechenyi Bath is 100 years old in 2013, and throughout its century-old history, about 100 millions of bathers have enjoyed the warm medicinal waters and the fun pools.
In exchange for the half-hour cardio exercise that's required to mount the verdant Gellért Hill, your reward will be sweeping 360-degree views of Budapest. For the best experience, take the path that's to the south of the hill, setting off opposite Gellért Bath, and descend on the other side.
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Citadella
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In exchange for the half-hour cardio exercise that's required to mount the verdant Gellért Hill, your reward will be sweeping 360-degree views of Budapest. For the best experience, take the path that's to the south of the hill, setting off opposite Gellért Bath, and descend on the other side.
Arguably the most striking of all the bridges in Budapest, twin-towered Széchenyi Chain Bridge, which is named in honour of its initiator, István Széchenyi, is particularly beautiful when lit up at night. The city's oldest span was actually built by Scotsman Adam Clark, who enjoys one of the few places reserved for foreigners in the Hungarian panoply of heroes. When it opened in 1849, Chain Bridge was unique for two reasons: it was the first link between Buda and Pest, and the nobility – previously exempt from all taxation – had to pay up like everybody else to use it.
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Széchenyi Chain Bridge
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Arguably the most striking of all the bridges in Budapest, twin-towered Széchenyi Chain Bridge, which is named in honour of its initiator, István Széchenyi, is particularly beautiful when lit up at night. The city's oldest span was actually built by Scotsman Adam Clark, who enjoys one of the few places reserved for foreigners in the Hungarian panoply of heroes. When it opened in 1849, Chain Bridge was unique for two reasons: it was the first link between Buda and Pest, and the nobility – previously exempt from all taxation – had to pay up like everybody else to use it.
St. Stephen's Basilica (Hungarian: Szent István-bazilika) is a Roman Catholic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. It is named in honour of Stephen, the first King of Hungary (c 975–1038), whose right hand is housed in the reliquary. It was the sixth largest church building in Hungary before 1920. Since the renaming of the primatial see, it's the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Esztergom-Budapest. Today, it is the third largest church building in present-day Hungary.
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Sankt Stefans basilika
1 Szent István tér
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St. Stephen's Basilica (Hungarian: Szent István-bazilika) is a Roman Catholic basilica in Budapest, Hungary. It is named in honour of Stephen, the first King of Hungary (c 975–1038), whose right hand is housed in the reliquary. It was the sixth largest church building in Hungary before 1920. Since the renaming of the primatial see, it's the co-cathedral of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Esztergom-Budapest. Today, it is the third largest church building in present-day Hungary.
Margaret Island provides a peaceful hideaway from hectic downtown Budapest with large green areas, flowery gardens, old trees, and lots of entertainment.
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Margaretøya
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Margaret Island provides a peaceful hideaway from hectic downtown Budapest with large green areas, flowery gardens, old trees, and lots of entertainment.
Környékek
Bauhaus – an architectural style named after a German art school of the same name – was a big hit in Budapest, with many residential buildings, cinemas and churches built in the style. It was popular between 1930 and 1948 and its buildings can mostly be seen in the Újlipótváros neighborhood, as well as in Szent István Park, and on Margit Körút.
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Újlipótváros
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Bauhaus – an architectural style named after a German art school of the same name – was a big hit in Budapest, with many residential buildings, cinemas and churches built in the style. It was popular between 1930 and 1948 and its buildings can mostly be seen in the Újlipótváros neighborhood, as well as in Szent István Park, and on Margit Körút.
Belváros or Downtown is the V. District of Budapest. It actually consists of two historic neighbourhoods with well-defined borders within the V. District - Lipótváros ("Leopold town", after Emperor Leopold II) in the north includes the Parliament and many governmental buildings, Szent István Basilica and some museums, while the southern part (Belváros proper) is mostly high class accommodations, shops and night life area.
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Inner City
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Belváros or Downtown is the V. District of Budapest. It actually consists of two historic neighbourhoods with well-defined borders within the V. District - Lipótváros ("Leopold town", after Emperor Leopold II) in the north includes the Parliament and many governmental buildings, Szent István Basilica and some museums, while the southern part (Belváros proper) is mostly high class accommodations, shops and night life area.
Explore Erzsébetváros - The Jewish Quarter of Budapest. If you’ve only got a weekend in Budapest, then one of the neighbourhood you must visit is the Jewish Quarter. While it doesn’t have the historical pedigree of Prague’s atmospheric Jewish Cemetery and medieval narrow streets, you’ll still find plenty of interesting snippets of history among the shabby chic lanes of this gentrified district. Mixing up synagogues and Yellow Star Houses with quirky design shops and eccentric ruin bars, this neighbourhood is one of the most exciting places in the city.
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Erzsébetváros
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Explore Erzsébetváros - The Jewish Quarter of Budapest. If you’ve only got a weekend in Budapest, then one of the neighbourhood you must visit is the Jewish Quarter. While it doesn’t have the historical pedigree of Prague’s atmospheric Jewish Cemetery and medieval narrow streets, you’ll still find plenty of interesting snippets of history among the shabby chic lanes of this gentrified district. Mixing up synagogues and Yellow Star Houses with quirky design shops and eccentric ruin bars, this neighbourhood is one of the most exciting places in the city.
Víziváros is a part of Budapest, on the Buda side of the Danube, just under the Castle Hill. With twisting streets, and old, cozy houses and staircases. It is a part of the city that revives the feeling of ancient ages. A unique quality of this area is that the entrances of the houses are all about one meter below the water level. Víziváros has been a busy part of the city ever since Roman times, the Turks even built a bath here, which is still open to visitors.
Víziváros
Víziváros is a part of Budapest, on the Buda side of the Danube, just under the Castle Hill. With twisting streets, and old, cozy houses and staircases. It is a part of the city that revives the feeling of ancient ages. A unique quality of this area is that the entrances of the houses are all about one meter below the water level. Víziváros has been a busy part of the city ever since Roman times, the Turks even built a bath here, which is still open to visitors.
Castle Hill is a kilometre-long limestone plateau towering 170m above the Danube. It contains some of Budapest’s most important medieval monuments and museums and is a Unesco World Heritage Site. Below it is a 28km-long network of caves formed by thermal springs. The walled area consists of two distinct parts: the Old Town to the north, where commoners once lived, and the Royal Palace to the south, the original site of the castle built by Béla IV in the 13th century and reserved for the nobility.
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Castle Hill
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Castle Hill is a kilometre-long limestone plateau towering 170m above the Danube. It contains some of Budapest’s most important medieval monuments and museums and is a Unesco World Heritage Site. Below it is a 28km-long network of caves formed by thermal springs. The walled area consists of two distinct parts: the Old Town to the north, where commoners once lived, and the Royal Palace to the south, the original site of the castle built by Béla IV in the 13th century and reserved for the nobility.